Alia Hamaoui — Artist in Residence

Layered fragments, muted tones and lost histories are interwoven into Alia Hamaoui’s multidisciplinary practice. A combination of print, painting and ‘construction’; Hamaoui’s work embodies a shift from physical remnants of the past to the digitising of memories. It’s the combination of all of these disciplines which makes her work so tangible. You become enticed by

«The city is full of interesting scenarios that just want to be discovered, for example the way construction workers set down their different materials. Those workers subconsciously create wonderful compositions of materials, casually and entirely by chance.»

Mike Okay  Halle, Germany. Tell us a little about yourself. It’s interesting to know your way from street art to studio and gallery practice. I grew up during the 1980s in the GDR, in a planned city called Halle-Neustadt which was dominated by the geometric forms of the prefabricated buildings. My image of this part

«Vegan Racism» — Marco Pariani

Marco Pariani (1986) is one of the most interesting figures of the new Italian art scene. For his first exhibition at Ribordy Contemporary, Pariani presents a set of paintings whose formal vocabulary derives from Abstract Expressionism, appropriating significant elements such as large scale formats, dramatic and expressive pictorial keys and gestures, as well as a contained

«When I am working on my paintings, I don’t think about making Art. At best I don’t think at all, but only make decisions on the canvas — that’s fun, because in my day-life outside the studio I don’t like decisions at all.»

Jenny Brosinski Berlin, Germany.   We would like to know about you more. Where did your journey to art begin? I was born in Celle in the north of Germany and I grew up in the little light blue house of my grandparents in a small village in the countryside. My journey to art began

Richie Culver, Lauren DiCioccio & Pedro Matos — Stitchingthecracks

Graffiti-like scrawls, canvases with semi-familiar faces, and tactile, bulbous sculptures in an array of bright colours – “Stitchingthecracks” (6 September – 6 October) at Kristin Hjellegjerde London, presents an investigation, reinterpretation and recontextualization of the meaning of the everyday. While different in approach, the works of Richie Culver, Lauren Dicioccio and Pedro Matos share an