David von Bahr’s studio

Tell us a bit about yourself. How did you understand that you want to pursue art? Best of my belief, you have a considerable experience in graffiti.

I started with graffiti when I was about 12 years old, I understood quickly that I had an extreme need to express myself and almost became obsessed with it. In the last couple of years, I started to be curious how the transition would be if I moved indoors and realized kind of quickly that I have a very big benefit from my background when it comes to composition, sensations and fearless to make failures etc. I’m currently based in Stockholm where I study second year BA Fine Art.


The technique that you use is quite aggressive. Can you say that your pictures are the emotional outburst?

 My works are always an ongoing and never-ending process of effects as aggression, impulsivity and characterized by manic state. The enjoying of losing control over the paintings, to take care of the mistakes and find the beauty in it.

Recently, it’s quite normal practice when artists who painted on the streets move to studios and galleries. What do you think about this tendency?

I think its good, painting as a concept develops and changes as society changes. It’s obvious that paintings in the public sphere will affect more studio-based art, and create questions of what painting can be.

Tell us about your studio. It’s pretty big for the first one. How much time do you spend there?

I’ve walked by this building almost every day for the last 1,5 year and I knew that it was abandoned so I contacted the owner of it and asked if I could use it as a temporary studio before its demolished. First, they said strictly NO, then – I called again and again and finally they said yes. I guess I got lucky, and the best part, it’s for free.

What does your usual working day look like?

I try to have at least two or three canvases stretched and prepared from the day before so when I come to the studio in the morning I can just begin directly. I think a LOT and paint fast, in that way my process is always liquid. Often I just walk around in the studio, listen to music and drink coffee and when I’m in the mood I paint. I usually have a principle to finish the stretched canvases at the end of the day, if I’m not finished I usually start over.

What inspires you in your work best of all? And what are your plans for this year?

To work in specific spaces and letting my painting actions be shaped by the space. To be open for the dialog that happens when all the works talks to the newer ones. I will continue to explore and develop my methods of dialogues between locations and painting actions.

 

2 replies on “ David von Bahr’s studio ”
  1. Hi David…Im a MD specialized in Stress and Longevity.
    I study a lot about neurocience and artistic and creative process
    Emitional painting is a wonderful tool to lower the stress neurotransmitters and hormones.
    I liked your work…and style…congrats
    Where are you from?

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